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Melbourne (Tullamarine) Australia

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Thing To Do & See


National Gallery of Victoria International

Beyond the water wall you'll find international art that runs from the ancient to the contemporary. Completed in 1967, the original NGV building – Roy Grounds' 'cranky icon' – was one of Australia's most controversial but ultimately respected Modernist masterpieces. Interior remodelling was undertaken from 1996 to 2003, overseen by Mario Bellini. Don't miss a gaze up at the Great Hall's stained-glass ceiling.

Elwood Beach

A short drive or concerted foreshore walk will take you to this swimming beach. It tends to be less windswept, though often no less crowded, than St Kilda and is surrounded by leafy Elwood Park and Point Ormond Reserve. There are playgrounds and kiosks.

Queen Victoria Market

This site has been the market for more than 130 years, prior to which it was a burial ground. This is where Melburnians shop for fresh produce including organics and Asian specialities. There's a deli, meat and fish hall as well as a fast food and restaurant zone. On Wednesday evenings from mid-November to the end of February, a night market with hawker-style food stalls, bars and music takes over.

Royal Botanic Gardens

The RBG is one of Melbourne's most glorious attractions. Sprawling beside the Yarra River, the beautifully designed gardens feature a global selection of plantings as well as specific Australian gardens. Along with the abundance of plant species, there's a surprising amount of wildlife, including waterfowl, ducks, swans and child-scaring eels in and around the ornamental lake, as well as cockatoos and possums. There's also the excellent, nature-based Ian Potter Children's Garden.The gardens are encircled by the Tan, a 4km-long former horse-exercising track, now used to exercise joggers. During the summer months, the gardens play host to the Moonlight Cinema and theatre performances.

Melbourne Museum

This confident postmodern exhibition space mixes old-style object displays with themed interactive display areas. The museum's reach is almost too broad to be cohesive, but it provides a grand sweep of Victoria's natural and cultural histories. Walk through the reconstructed laneway lives of the 1800s or become immersed in the legend of champion racehorse Phar Lap. Bunjilaka, on the ground floor, presents Indigenous stories and history told through objects and Aboriginal voices. There's also an open-air forest atrium featuring Victorian plants and animals and an Imax cinema next door.

Royal Melbourne Zoo

Melbourne's zoo is one of the city's most popular attractions. Walkways pass through some enclosures; you can stroll through the bird aviary, cross a bridge over the lions' park or enter a tropical hothouse full of colourful butterflies. There's also a large collection of native animals in natural bush settings, a platypus aquarium, fur seals, lions and tigers, plenty of reptiles, and an 'am I in Asia?' elephant enclosure. In summer, the zoo hosts Twilight Concerts. Roar 'n' Snore allows you to camp at the zoo and join the keepers on their morning feeding rounds.

Ian Potter Centre: National Gallery of Victoria Australia

This houses the NGV's extensive collection of Australian paintings, decorative arts, photography, prints, drawings, sculpture, fashion, textiles and jewellery.The gallery's Indigenous collection dominates the ground floor and seeks to challenge ideas of the 'authentic'. Upstairs there are permanent displays of colonial paintings and drawings by 19th-century Aboriginal artists. There's also the work of Heidelberg School impressionists and an extensive collection of the work of the modernist 'Angry Penguins', including Sir Sidney Nolan, Arthur Boyd, Joy Hester and Albert Tucker.

St Kilda Foreshore

There are palm-fringed promenades, a parkland strand and a long stretch of sand. Still, don't expect Bondi or Noosa. St Kilda's seaside appeal is more Brighton, England than Baywatch, despite 20-odd years of glitzy development. And that's the way Melburnians like it; a certain depth of character and an all-weather charm, with wild days on the bay providing for spectacular cloudscapes and terse little waves, as well as the more predictable sparkling blue of summer.

National Gallery of Victoria International

Beyond the water wall you'll find international art that runs from the ancient to the contemporary. Completed in 1967, the original NGV building – Roy Grounds' 'cranky icon' – was one of Australia's most controversial but ultimately respected Modernist masterpieces. Interior remodelling was undertaken from 1996 to 2003, overseen by Mario Bellini. Don't miss a gaze up at the Great Hall's stained-glass ceiling.

Elwood Beach

A short drive or concerted foreshore walk will take you to this swimming beach. It tends to be less windswept, though often no less crowded, than St Kilda and is surrounded by leafy Elwood Park and Point Ormond Reserve. There are playgrounds and kiosks.

Queen Victoria Market

This site has been the market for more than 130 years, prior to which it was a burial ground. This is where Melburnians shop for fresh produce including organics and Asian specialities. There's a deli, meat and fish hall as well as a fast food and restaurant zone. On Wednesday evenings from mid-November to the end of February, a night market with hawker-style food stalls, bars and music takes over.

Federation Square

Striking Federation Square, despite never-ending debate of its architectural merits, has become the place to celebrate, protest or party. Squatting by the Yarra and occupying a prominent city block, the ‘square’ is far from square. Its undulating forecourt of inscribed Kimberley stone echoes the town squares of Europe. The surrounding buildings sport a reptilian skin that takes its cue from the endlessly dissecting lines of the city’s grid; within are cultural heavyweights like the National Gallery of Victoria Australia (NGVA) and the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI). There’s also restaurants, the thrumming Transport pub, and a few select retail outlets. At the square’s edge is the subterranean Melbourne Visitor Information Centre, a jam-packed resource for travellers.

Royal Botanic Gardens

The RBG is one of Melbourne's most glorious attractions. Sprawling beside the Yarra River, the beautifully designed gardens feature a global selection of plantings as well as specific Australian gardens. Along with the abundance of plant species, there's a surprising amount of wildlife, including waterfowl, ducks, swans and child-scaring eels in and around the ornamental lake, as well as cockatoos and possums. There's also the excellent, nature-based Ian Potter Children's Garden.The gardens are encircled by the Tan, a 4km-long former horse-exercising track, now used to exercise joggers. During the summer months, the gardens play host to the Moonlight Cinema and theatre performances.

Melbourne Museum

This confident postmodern exhibition space mixes old-style object displays with themed interactive display areas. The museum's reach is almost too broad to be cohesive, but it provides a grand sweep of Victoria's natural and cultural histories. Walk through the reconstructed laneway lives of the 1800s or become immersed in the legend of champion racehorse Phar Lap. Bunjilaka, on the ground floor, presents Indigenous stories and history told through objects and Aboriginal voices. There's also an open-air forest atrium featuring Victorian plants and animals and an Imax cinema next door.

Royal Melbourne Zoo

Melbourne's zoo is one of the city's most popular attractions. Walkways pass through some enclosures; you can stroll through the bird aviary, cross a bridge over the lions' park or enter a tropical hothouse full of colourful butterflies. There's also a large collection of native animals in natural bush settings, a platypus aquarium, fur seals, lions and tigers, plenty of reptiles, and an 'am I in Asia?' elephant enclosure. In summer, the zoo hosts Twilight Concerts. Roar 'n' Snore allows you to camp at the zoo and join the keepers on their morning feeding rounds.

Ian Potter Centre: National Gallery of Victoria Australia

This houses the NGV's extensive collection of Australian paintings, decorative arts, photography, prints, drawings, sculpture, fashion, textiles and jewellery.The gallery's Indigenous collection dominates the ground floor and seeks to challenge ideas of the 'authentic'. Upstairs there are permanent displays of colonial paintings and drawings by 19th-century Aboriginal artists. There's also the work of Heidelberg School impressionists and an extensive collection of the work of the modernist 'Angry Penguins', including Sir Sidney Nolan, Arthur Boyd, Joy Hester and Albert Tucker.

National Gallery of Victoria: International

There's much to discover behind the wonderful water wall. The NGVI space pays close consideration to its permanently displayed artworks, regarded as Australia's best international collection. Key works, such as Rembrandt's self-portrait, feature in the open spaces, promoting a sense of discovery. You might also bump into Monet and Modigliani, or Bacon and Rubens.

Queen Victoria Market

With over 600 traders, it’s the largest open-air market in the southern hemisphere and attracts thousands of shoppers. The market has been on the site for more than 130 years, prior to which it was a burial ground. Melburnians love to shop at the ‘Vic’. Fresh produce includes organics and Asian specialties, plus there are deli, meat and fish halls. Saturday mornings are particularly buzzing, with marketgoers breakfasting to the sounds and shows of buskers. Clothing and knick-knack stalls dominate on Sundays; while big on variety, don’t come looking for style. If you’re in the market for sheepskin moccasins you’ll be in luck. In summer the market is open on Wednesday evenings from 5.30pm to 10pm, when it features hawker-style food stalls, and music and dance performances. It also runs a variety of tours and cooking classes. Phone for details or visit the website.

Herring Island

Once an unloved dumping ground for silt, Herring Island is now a prelapsarian garden that seeks to preserve the original trees, shrubs and grasses of the Yarra and provide a home for indigenous animals such as parrots, possums and lizards. Hidden within is an impressive collection of environmental sculpture including work by Brit Andy Goldsworthy and locals Julie Collins, Robert Jacks, Robert Bridgewater and architectural photographer John Gollings. Designated picnic areas, with barbecues, make for a rare retreat just 3km from the city centre. The island is theoretically open to visitors all year round but can only be reached by boat. A Parks Victoria punt operates from Como Landing on Alexandra Ave in South Yarra.

St Kilda Foreshore

There are palm-fringed promenades, a parkland strand and a long stretch of sand. Still, don't expect Bondi or Noosa. St Kilda's seaside appeal is more Brighton, England than Baywatch, despite 20-odd years of glitzy development. And that's the way Melburnians like it; a certain depth of character and an all-weather charm, with wild days on the bay providing for spectacular cloudscapes and terse little waves, as well as the more predictable sparkling blue of summer.

National Gallery of Victoria International

Beyond the water wall you'll find international art that runs from the ancient to the contemporary. Completed in 1967, the original NGV building – Roy Grounds' 'cranky icon' – was one of Australia's most controversial but ultimately respected Modernist masterpieces. Interior remodelling was undertaken from 1996 to 2003, overseen by Mario Bellini. Don't miss a gaze up at the Great Hall's stained-glass ceiling.

Elwood Beach

A short drive or concerted foreshore walk will take you to this swimming beach. It tends to be less windswept, though often no less crowded, than St Kilda and is surrounded by leafy Elwood Park and Point Ormond Reserve. There are playgrounds and kiosks.

Queen Victoria Market

This site has been the market for more than 130 years, prior to which it was a burial ground. This is where Melburnians shop for fresh produce including organics and Asian specialities. There's a deli, meat and fish hall as well as a fast food and restaurant zone. On Wednesday evenings from mid-November to the end of February, a night market with hawker-style food stalls, bars and music takes over.

Federation Square

Striking Federation Square, despite never-ending debate of its architectural merits, has become the place to celebrate, protest or party. Squatting by the Yarra and occupying a prominent city block, the ‘square’ is far from square. Its undulating forecourt of inscribed Kimberley stone echoes the town squares of Europe. The surrounding buildings sport a reptilian skin that takes its cue from the endlessly dissecting lines of the city’s grid; within are cultural heavyweights like the National Gallery of Victoria Australia (NGVA) and the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI). There’s also restaurants, the thrumming Transport pub, and a few select retail outlets. At the square’s edge is the subterranean Melbourne Visitor Information Centre, a jam-packed resource for travellers.

Royal Botanic Gardens

The RBG is one of Melbourne's most glorious attractions. Sprawling beside the Yarra River, the beautifully designed gardens feature a global selection of plantings as well as specific Australian gardens. Along with the abundance of plant species, there's a surprising amount of wildlife, including waterfowl, ducks, swans and child-scaring eels in and around the ornamental lake, as well as cockatoos and possums. There's also the excellent, nature-based Ian Potter Children's Garden.The gardens are encircled by the Tan, a 4km-long former horse-exercising track, now used to exercise joggers. During the summer months, the gardens play host to the Moonlight Cinema and theatre performances.

Melbourne Museum

This confident postmodern exhibition space mixes old-style object displays with themed interactive display areas. The museum's reach is almost too broad to be cohesive, but it provides a grand sweep of Victoria's natural and cultural histories. Walk through the reconstructed laneway lives of the 1800s or become immersed in the legend of champion racehorse Phar Lap. Bunjilaka, on the ground floor, presents Indigenous stories and history told through objects and Aboriginal voices. There's also an open-air forest atrium featuring Victorian plants and animals and an Imax cinema next door.

Royal Melbourne Zoo

Melbourne's zoo is one of the city's most popular attractions. Walkways pass through some enclosures; you can stroll through the bird aviary, cross a bridge over the lions' park or enter a tropical hothouse full of colourful butterflies. There's also a large collection of native animals in natural bush settings, a platypus aquarium, fur seals, lions and tigers, plenty of reptiles, and an 'am I in Asia?' elephant enclosure. In summer, the zoo hosts Twilight Concerts. Roar 'n' Snore allows you to camp at the zoo and join the keepers on their morning feeding rounds.

Ian Potter Centre: National Gallery of Victoria Australia

This houses the NGV's extensive collection of Australian paintings, decorative arts, photography, prints, drawings, sculpture, fashion, textiles and jewellery.The gallery's Indigenous collection dominates the ground floor and seeks to challenge ideas of the 'authentic'. Upstairs there are permanent displays of colonial paintings and drawings by 19th-century Aboriginal artists. There's also the work of Heidelberg School impressionists and an extensive collection of the work of the modernist 'Angry Penguins', including Sir Sidney Nolan, Arthur Boyd, Joy Hester and Albert Tucker.

National Gallery of Victoria: International

There's much to discover behind the wonderful water wall. The NGVI space pays close consideration to its permanently displayed artworks, regarded as Australia's best international collection. Key works, such as Rembrandt's self-portrait, feature in the open spaces, promoting a sense of discovery. You might also bump into Monet and Modigliani, or Bacon and Rubens.

Queen Victoria Market

With over 600 traders, it’s the largest open-air market in the southern hemisphere and attracts thousands of shoppers. The market has been on the site for more than 130 years, prior to which it was a burial ground. Melburnians love to shop at the ‘Vic’. Fresh produce includes organics and Asian specialties, plus there are deli, meat and fish halls. Saturday mornings are particularly buzzing, with marketgoers breakfasting to the sounds and shows of buskers. Clothing and knick-knack stalls dominate on Sundays; while big on variety, don’t come looking for style. If you’re in the market for sheepskin moccasins you’ll be in luck. In summer the market is open on Wednesday evenings from 5.30pm to 10pm, when it features hawker-style food stalls, and music and dance performances. It also runs a variety of tours and cooking classes. Phone for details or visit the website.

Herring Island

Once an unloved dumping ground for silt, Herring Island is now a prelapsarian garden that seeks to preserve the original trees, shrubs and grasses of the Yarra and provide a home for indigenous animals such as parrots, possums and lizards. Hidden within is an impressive collection of environmental sculpture including work by Brit Andy Goldsworthy and locals Julie Collins, Robert Jacks, Robert Bridgewater and architectural photographer John Gollings. Designated picnic areas, with barbecues, make for a rare retreat just 3km from the city centre. The island is theoretically open to visitors all year round but can only be reached by boat. A Parks Victoria punt operates from Como Landing on Alexandra Ave in South Yarra.

St Kilda Foreshore

There are palm-fringed promenades, a parkland strand and a long stretch of sand. Still, don't expect Bondi or Noosa. St Kilda's seaside appeal is more Brighton, England than Baywatch, despite 20-odd years of glitzy development. And that's the way Melburnians like it; a certain depth of character and an all-weather charm, with wild days on the bay providing for spectacular cloudscapes and terse little waves, as well as the more predictable sparkling blue of summer.

Lonely Planet has supplied content for Jetstar. All Lonely Planet content is independently reviewed and reflects their editorial independence and impartiality.

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