Don't miss these sushi hotspots in Osaka

We round up some of the must-visit sushi restaurants in Japan's food capital.

There are hundreds of sushi varieties to try in Osaka.
  • Katie Lockhart
  • January 2019

If you’re in the mood for sushi and happen to be in Japan’s food hotspot Osaka, opens in new window hunt down these local favourites – there’s everything from cheap and cheerful sushi trains to high-end restaurants with Michelin-starred chefs serving up multi-course menus.

Endo sushi

Serving some of the city’s finest fish for more than 100 years, this cosy, no-frills sushi mecca opens in new window draws in the crowds for its top-quality market-fresh produce and attractive prices – you can get five pieces for about AUD $12. The original is located in the Central Fish Market but the newer outpost in Kyobashi’s Keihan Mall, north of Osaka Castle, is just as good.

The fish is fresh from the market at Endo Sushi.
The fish is fresh from the market at Endo Sushi.

Sushiyoshi

With two Michelin stars, this Kita restaurant is a coveted reservation so make sure you book in advance (and save up) for one of only eight seats at the minimalist wooden table. Not exactly a traditional sushi experience, here it is a degustation-style three hour meal served by the friendly chef who explains each dish (with a few jokes thrown in).

Sushi Yoshi takes pride in their tiny edible creations.
Sushi Yoshi takes pride in their tiny edible creations.

Mawaru Genroku Sushi

The idea for the now ubiquitous sushi train, known as “kaiten”, was created in 1958 after Yoshiaki Shiraishi – the founder of this shop opens in new window – saw beer on a conveyor belt at an Asahi brewery and decided to implement it in his sushi restaurant. If you can’t make it to the original in East Osaka, try one of its numerous offshoots dotted throughout the city to stack as many empty sushi plates as possible for as little as AUD $1.50 a pop.

KawaUme

Overseen by chef Takagi Kazuo, whose eponymous restaurant Takagi has held two Michelin stars eight years in a row, this new eatery in the Hilton Osaka opens in new window in downtown Kita, offers sushi and kaiseki (multi-course meals). Watching the chefs beautifully plate each piece is as important a part of the experience as the food.


Harukoma Sushi

Join the queues outside this unpretentious eatery on the city’s longest shopping street, Tenjinbashisuji Shotengai, to gain access into a bustling hub where chefs expertly prepare sushi and sashimi for the constant cycle of locals and tourists occupying the 30 or so seats. While the food and (potent) wasabi is as authentic as it gets, they also have an English menu.